Sweet dog looking for new home is shunned due to blindness

Sweet blind dog is left on its own.
Dogs that are blind and deaf are hard to handle. © Prasoon Raj. Unsplash

To adopt a dog that is blind as well as deaf is not the thing to do if you haven’t the time. But a woman from Canada believes someone will one day be the right person to take on a ‘sweet’ dog she found with the life-limiting conditions. The search continues to find a family willing to have ‘Stevie’.

Nicole Simone the founder of Redemption Paws, a rescue centre for stray dogs based in Toronto, Canada, knew she had to act after she had watched footage of a 2-year-old deaf dog roaming the streets of a Texas town.

- Advertisement -

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Redemption Paws (@redemptionpaws) on

IMAGE: © redemptionpaws. Instagram.com

Within days Simone had retrieved Stevie from the pound thinking she would easily be able to re-home such a ‘sweet’ dog. Alas, he had to be treated for microphthalmia and heartworm and his eyes, which were already infected, were removed.

Rehoming is proving difficult

Despite her valiant efforts to extol the beauty of the dog, Simone’s attempts to rehome Stevie have so far proved fruitless. She now tells prospective adopters that they should consider Stevie a companion rather than a project.

 

- Advertisement -
View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Redemption Paws (@redemptionpaws) on

IMAGE: © redemptionpaws. Instagram.com

Stevie needs empathy and structure. Feeling sorry for him and not giving him boundaries not only makes it difficult for adopters — but it makes it difficult for Stevie to adjust to new surroundings,’ Simone told a reporter from The Dodo.

You can find details of Stevie on the Redemption Paws website. He is listed as: ‘A Hound mix, Estimated 2 – 4 years old, 45 lbs, Male’. His picture belies the difficult route he has travelled. Simone warns there is still some way to go until Stevie is fully recovered.

Read also: Battle-weary stray dog makes his journey to safety

Nick John Whittle lives and works in Birmingham, UK. He is a specialist copywriter, journalist and theatre critic. Over the years Nick’s family has owned dogs, cats, rodents and birds. The history of animal domestication and of people’s relationship with their pets over the centuries interests him a lot. He cares greatly about the welfare of both feral and domesticated animals and supports ongoing protection of endangered species.