English Setter

Other names: Laverack, Llewellin Setter

English Setter

The English Setter is a pointing dog of medium size that, by all accounts, could be considered the perfect dog. He excels in hunting and proves himself to be a very good companion dog for the whole family. Gentle, attentive, docile and affectionate, with his enthusiasm and social competence, he brings much joy to both little and bigs one alike. Very active, he is best suited to available and fit owners who will be able to meet the dog's many needs for expenditure, which are not to be underestimated.

Key facts about the English Setter

Life expectancy :

5

19

10

14

Temperament :

Affectionate Playful Hunter

Size :

Origins and history

This dog has very old roots. He is probably a descendant of the ancient Spaniel, also known as the German Spaniel, which was one of the incarnations of the primitive Canis Familiaris Intermedius. The Breed had been established in 1860 by Edward Laverack and would have to wait another twenty years before spreading outside of England. It is one of the most commonly used pointing dogs for hunting.

FCI breed nomenclature

FCI Group

Group 7 - Pointing Dogs

Section

Section 2 : British and Irish Pointers and Setters

Physical characteristics of the English Setter

    Adult size

    Female : Between 24 and 26 in

    Male : Between 26 and 27 in

    Weight

    Female : Between 44 and 55 lb

    Male : Between 44 and 55 lb

    Coat colour

    Black
    White
    Brown

    Type of coat

    Long
    Wavy

    Eye colour

    Brown

    Description

    The English setter is the most beautiful of all pointing dogs. It is mesomorphic, with a rather rectangular-shape torso. The head is long, well-defined, light. The length of the skull is equal to that of the muzzle. The skullcap is slightly domed. The stop is pronounced but not abrupt. The eyes are big and expressive.The ears are set low, hanging, adjacent to the cheeks. The back is straight, the kidneys muscular and quite arched. The limbs are perfectly straight. The tail is set high: big and robust at its base, it thins down towards the tip. It is worn rather low, slightly curved outwards like a reversed saber.

    Good to know

    As the English Setter is a particularly handsome breed and also highly sought after as a companion dog, certain unscrupulous breeders have contented themselves with selecting lineages for their aesthetic qualities, with little regard for their personalities or hunting predispositions. Actually, in England, the breeding of show dog Setters and hunting Setters has become distinctly separated, as if it were concerned with two different breeds, which is a reprehensible mistake.

    Temperament

    • 100%

      Affectionate

      Gentle, cheerful and attentive, faithful and very friendly- be it to members of his own social group or even towards his fellow canines- the English Setter is a dog that could easily be deemed perfect, such is the extent to which his character is good and held in high esteem.

    • 100%

      Playful

      Enthusiastic and active, playtime will be a great source of joy to this dog who loves spending time with members of his social group, and with children in particular.

      Be careful to play fetching games in moderation with this dog, so as not to overly reinforce the dog's retrieving instinct- especially if he only ever functions as a family dog and never as a hunter.

    • 33%

      Calm

      His calm demeanour conceals, in reality, a very active and athletic dog who requires heaps of exercise and attention to remain fully content.

    • 66%

      Intelligent

      This english dog is intelligent, whether it be while hunting or in training. He quickly grasps what is required from him and takes huge pride in pleasing his owners.

    • 100%

      Hunter

      This dog has a very sharpened sense for hunting, he is an outstanding pointing dog who can be a precious asset to his leader.

      His advanced skills places him amongst the most commonly used Pointers in England. Moreover, he represents more than half of the workforce involved in field-trial (trials aimed at selecting the best hunting dogs).

    • 66%

      Fearful / wary of strangers

      Very sociable, the English Setter has a rather balanced personality which allows him to sniff the difference out between guests and trespassers remarkably well. Never resorting to aggressivity, if he is suspicious towards someone, he will just ignore them and avoid contact. On the flipside, once he starts trusting, it is very easy to get along with him.

      Certain more suspicious breed selections produce very wary dogs. The latter personality trait is absolutely not desirable.

    • 33%

      Independent

      This dog is generally completely devoted to his owner and family. He needs attention and affection to feel good in his skin. The Laverack Setter (its breeder's namesake) would be particularly miserable if he were to be excluded from family and social life.

      Behaviour of the English Setter

      • 33%

        Tolerates solitude

        At times very sensitive, and exceptionally attached to his social group, the setter is not a big loner, he tends to be rather miserable during his owners' absences.

        A gradual and positive conditioning to staying alone is necessary and must be implemented at home from the Setter pup's youngest age.

        The absences must never be extended as this active dog could become explicit about his disapproval of the situation (barking, destruction, etc.).

        Therefore, both prior to and right after his owners' absences, this English dog has to be well spent (outdoor walks) in order to have his fun and expend the large stores of energy he has. Actually, when he is home alone, some toys could be provided to keep him busy and stop him from getting bored.

      • 66%

        Easy to train / obedience

        As with all good work dogs, the training process is pleasant if it has been initiated early enough, so as to stop any bad habits from developing, and in order to maintain a degree of coherence throughout the dog’s life.

        Particularly sensitive, positive reinforcement must be prioritised as this dog will not tolerate any form of brutality or unfounded reprimands, which would only serve to sully the master-dog relationship.

        In addition to being precocious, coherent and fair, the training will have to be coupled with an approach that is as firm as it is gentle. This will ensure the best results with this pooch.

        The priority is to train hailing which, contrary to what might be expected, will not be that difficult to implement with this English hunting dog. In fact, pointers are often more malleable and docile than hounds, for instance.

      • 66%

        Barking

        The English Setter's vocal manifestations are indeed present but remain nevertheless moderate, easily reined in if need be.

        He can prove to be loud if he perceives imminent danger, if he is overly excited, if he does not receive all the attention that he solicits or if he is left alone for too long, for example.

        At any rate, these are situations that can easily be solved if a coherent attitude is adopted by the owners, and if they meet all the dog's needs.

      • 100%

        Tendency to run away

        A born tracker, if he detects an interesting scent, this wonderful English hunting dog could in fact run away without much consideration for his owner. In this sense, teaching the dog how to be hailed as well as learning to say no to him are essential. 
                      
        If he lives in a garden, the fencing will have to be foolproof in order to guarantee the dog's security and stop him from being tempted to escape. Hunting dogs who run away often put themselves in dangerous situations because, hypnotically drawn towards smells and tracking, they are sometimes oblivious to their surroundings (roads, cars, etc.).

        A medallion/tag with the contact details of the owner will facilitate searching for the dog if ever he goes missing.