Russian Toy

Other names: Russkiy Toy, Russian Toy Terrier

Russian Toy

Energetic, bold, loyal and loving, the Russkiy Toy makes for the perfect companion dog, especially for those who live in small houses or flats.Originating from Russia, she was originally used to fight rats and so, is extremely alert and holds a fairly high prey drive. This pooch has fairly low exercise requirements and thrives on human company and attention - unfortunately, this makes her prone to separation anxiety.

Key facts about the Russian Toy

Life expectancy :

5

17

10

12

Temperament :

Affectionate Playful

Size :

Origins and history

The adorable Russkiy Toy descends from the English Toy Terrier and was bred to hunt and kill rats. However, due to her charming personality and cute looks, she quickly became popular with Russian aristocrats as a companion dog. The population withered in the 1920s when Communism was on the rise, and almost became extinct during the fall of the Iron Curtain in 1989. Thankfully, though, the little trooper is still going strong today due to a rise in popularity in other countries.

Discover 10 of the most beautiful Russian dog breeds

FCI breed nomenclature

FCI Group

Group 9 - Companion and Toy Dogs

Section

Section 9 : Continental Toy Spaniel and Russian Toy

Physical characteristics of the Russian Toy

    Adult size

    Female : Between 9 and 11 in

    Male : Between 9 and 11 in

    Weight

    Female : Between 4 and 7 lb

    Male : Between 4 and 7 lb

    Coat colour

    Black
    Brown
    Blue
    Red
    Sand

    Type of coat

    Short
    Long

    Eye colour

    Brown

    Description

    The Russian Toy Terrier is a cute-looking small dog with a small head, tiny nose and pointed muzzle. She has large, wide-set eyes and adorable feathered, upright, large ears. In terms of the body, the Russkiy Toy has a straight back, lean, straight legs and an overall ‘elegant’ appearance. This is quite a fragile breed, even though the dog herself thinks she’s tough as nails!

    Good to know

    The Russkiy Toy has come extremely close to extinction - not once, but twice!

    Temperament

    • 100%

      Affectionate

      She forms strong bonds with her family and thrives living a life full of human company. Extremely loyal to whoever she considers the master.

    • 100%

      Playful

      Cheerful, playful and jolly, the Russkiy Toy loves to play with and entertain her family, remaining puppy-like into her adult years.

    • 66%

      Calm

      This dog is quite capable of being wise if her needs are respected.

    • 66%

      Intelligent

      A fairly intelligent pooch who can easily pick up new tricks and learn commands.

    • 33%

      Hunter

      Although terriers usually love the chase, the Russkiy Toy doesn’t have a strong instinct for hunting and predation.

    • 66%

      Fearful / wary of strangers

      The Russian Toy Terrier can be wary of strangers at first but does warm to them eventually. Early socialization is essential to this breed - otherwise, she could become aloof and, in some cases, aggressive around new people.

    • 33%

      Independent

      She is a pleasure dog who is totally dependent on her human.

      Behaviour of the Russian Toy

      • 33%

        Tolerates solitude

        The Russkiy Toy loves nothing more than human company and therefore doesn’t enjoy time alone. She may become destructive if left alone for hours at a time.

      • 100%

        Easy to train / obedience

        The Russian Toy Terrier falls somewhere in the middle when it comes to training. She picks up new tricks easily but can fall victim towards the classic ‘small dog syndrome’ if boundaries aren’t set early on. This breed hates harsh corrections and requires fun training sessions using plenty of positive reinforcement and rewards. To avoid seeing the willful, independent streak in this breed, make training consistent and extensive from an early age.

      • 100%

        Barking

        This breed often barks excessively, though thorough training can prevent this from turning into a long-term problem.

      • 33%