Polish Hound

Other names: Ogar Polski

Polish Hound

Who can resist these large dogs with soft ears like velvet? An ancient scent and hunting dog breed, the Polish Hound dates back many centuries, to ancestors who hunted and roamed the forests of Poland. In more current days, outside of his home country, he is more of a rarity. This gorgeous dog is energetic, gentle, clever and eager to please his owner. He certainly has the potential to make a brilliant family dog. 

Key facts about the Polish Hound

Life expectancy :

7

19

12

14

Temperament :

Hunter

Size :

Origins and history

During the 13th century, the Polish Hound breed was created purely as a hunting dog. The first canines were produced by crossbreeding indigenous Polish dogs with the St. Hubert’s Hound. Although its exact ancestry isn’t documented, the breed was valued by Polish hunters for its hunting and scenting abilities.

The breed almost became extinct during World War II, but because two colonels revived the breed, the Polish Hound of modern day developed. The Polish Hound, or the Ogar Polski as it’s known in its native country, was given FCI recognition in 1966. 

FCI breed nomenclature

FCI Group

Group 6 - Scent hounds and related breeds

Section

Section 1 : Scent hounds

Physical characteristics of the Polish Hound

Adult size

Female : Between 22 and 24 in

Male : Between 22 and 26 in

Weight

Female : Between 44 and 57 lb

Male : Between 55 and 71 lb

Coat colour

Red

Type of coat

Long

Eye colour

Brown

Description

The Polish Hound is a large, athletic dog, with a wide-shaped face. His face has slightly wrinkled skin which actually makes the dog look very curious and appealing. The Polish Hound has a deep chest, waist tucked up and a low and long tail. His ears are heavy, pendulous, and velvety.

Good to know

One of the most notable things about the Polish Hound breed is his stunning, resonant voice. When trailing his quarry through difficult terrains and in harsh weather conditions, he will constantly bark, or sing as he gallops along, giving chase. The female dog can be spotted easily, because of her higher pitched call. 

Temperament

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    Affectionate

    This Hound breed produces canines that are very affectionate, gentle and friendly, especially to members of their family. He just loves attention and will certainly be happy to give you hugs.

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    Playful

    The breed was mainly developed as a hunting dog, and although this remains his primary role, he is also excellent as a family pet. With his stable personality and calm nature, he loves playtimes with the children. 

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    Calm

    The Polish Hound is very reliable and gentle around children, very calm and with an eager attitude. This breed is often used as a therapy dog.

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    Intelligent

    Certainly a very intelligent dog and even though he has a gentle temperament, is also easy and eager to train.

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    Hunter

    The Polish Hound dog is a determined scent and hunting breed. This is his role above everything else. 

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    Fearful / wary of strangers

    This dog is likely to be very territorial and protective of his family. He very rarely shows any aggressive manners but will probably raise the alarm for potential strangers, with a loud bark

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    Independent

    The Polish Hound certainly is a very smart dog, always eager to learn. With rather a stubborn streak, he won’t be forced into any actions he isn’t happy with.

    Behaviour of the Polish Hound

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      Tolerates solitude

      As a dog who is quite gentle and calm, he is probably happy to be left on his own for short periods. However, as with most dog breeds, he also needs sufficient exercise and attention to prevent him from becoming bored, when he will display destructive habits.

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      Easy to train / obedience

      The Polish Hound is a very quick and eager pupil. He learns willingly and easily especially if rewards are offered. The trainer needs to be patient and calm and above all, not to raise his voice to the dog during training sessions. 

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      Barking

      This is probably the one point that lets the breed down. He can be quite persistent when something has annoyed or upset him and he will be easily recognised with his deep barking voice. 

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      Tendency to run away

      Of course, as a hunting breed he is going to be keen to follow any possible quarry, even when he isn’t directed to hunt. As he loves to run around outside, the space needs to be secure and fenced to prevent him from running off.

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