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Be inspired: Fisherman leaps to the rescue of Husky pup in trouble

Husky pup caught in plastic bottle dog-happy
© Shutterstock

Aleksandr Surovtsev is one of the world’s unsung heroes. Finding a young Husky the victim of plastic rubbish, he acted selflessly to save the helpless animal.

By Nick Whittle , 20 Nov 2019

Just outside the isolated town of Seyakha in the far north of Russia, a young man sought food to eat and sell. Hunting this far north on land covered by permafrost usually involves fishing in one of the many frozen lakes of the Yamal peninsular.

It was on one such fishing expedition that Pan Surovtsev spotted something unusual moving across the road ahead of him. As he walked closer to it Surovtsev realised he was looking at a young Siberian Husky with its head stuck in a plastic bottle.

Life saver

Its snout wedged tightly within the plastic, the Husky had no hope of freeing itself. Had it not been for Surovtsev’s intervention, the young animal would certainly have died.

In the video we see Surovtsev lift the bottle with the Husky still attached, but his attempts to pull the bottle from the face of the small dog fail. Suspecting the Husky’s head has created a vacuum inside the plastic, Surovtsev runs his finger along the rim of the bottle. This works. Surovtsev finally lifts the bottle from the animal’s snout.

Beneath the video of Surovtsev’s rescue he writes, “I went fishing and saw a puppy on the road. He was very cold and his head was stuck in a plastic bottle and I couldn't take it out of her at once.

“I finally released him and it turned out to be a Husky puppy. I took him home, fed him and later found his owner, who was looking for his puppy and gave him to him.”

You can see the video of the husky’s rescue here:


Plastic epidemic

The little Husky’s journey is inspiring but also troubling. That a plastic bottle may be found in such a remote area of the world is a reminder of how widespread plastics contamination is. Plastics do not just poison our water courses and vegetation; they also pose a significant danger to wildlife.