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Website prepares you for films in which dogs die

Old movie picture of dog
© Pixabay

Most of us swerve cinematic spoilers, especially when it comes to a storyline full of intrigue, shocks and twists. But there are others who don’t like surprises and of these few, a new website aims to settle the nerves.

By Nick Whittle, 18 Jun 2019

Does the Dog Die advertises itself as a source of emotional spoilers for ‘movies, TV, books and more’. It is a contributory website to which anyone can subscribe in order to add warnings of emotional low points.

Visitors refer to the entries on the site to find out whether a film includes any dog deaths (as well as other tragedies). The summaries within allow a visitor to choose whether or not to witness the heartbreak.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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The idea is not a new one. A 1971 issue of National Lampoon magazine included an article called 'Spoilers'. Written by Doug Kenney, it was one of the first times the term had been used to define the exposition of storylines of famous movies.

Does the Dog Die specialises in emotional alerts rather than storylines, which may be its saving grace. After all, more people than not would prefer to watch a film or read a book without knowing what happens.

Emotional triggers

However, Does the Dog Die may prove useful for families with small children. Its current categories include warnings of clowns, Santa, gun violence, animal abuse gaslighting (abusive behaviour), foetal miscarriages, people getting hit by cars, horses dying and people suffering seizures.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Critics of the site will argue that the acknowledgement of the content of any part of a plot ruins the magic of storytelling. Storytelling and the emotional ups and downs of a plot are what fire the imagination of those who listen or watch a story unfold. The British Film Classification warnings shown at the start of any film in the UK have been an adequate alerting measure since 1912.

The website appears only worthwhile for families with small children, and perhaps those who more easily than most exhibit neuroses.

Visit Does the Dog Die at your peril!