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Rescuers return to China to save a special pup from the cruel dog meat trade

Attitudes to the dog meat trade are changing
© Retrieve a Golden of the Midwest - RAGOM - Facebook

Retrieve a Golden of the Midwest (RAGOM), in Minnesota, USA, recently rescued a group of Golden Retrievers from China’s cruel and barbaric dog meat trade.

By Ashley Murphy, 17 Jun 2019

The specialised animal welfare group has spent years building relationships with animal charities within China to campaign against the outdated practice.

A cruel trade that needs to end

RAGOM also helps rescue Golden Retrievers and other pooches from dog meat farms. The lucky pups are housed in temporary locations before being transported to the USA and rehomed with loving families.

Nicole Stundzia is part of the rescue team at RAGOM. She said:

“My first experience was rescuing goldens who were abandoned to live on the streets of Turkey. That rescue was so meaningful that I found my calling and became a member of the Board of Directors and expanded our rescues to China.”

One pup who certainly appreciated all Nicole's hard work is 6-year-old Golden Retriever, Mama. Rescuers came across the adorable pooch during a recent rescue mission. However, the team simply didn't have enough room to bring another dog back to the US.

But that didn't stop Nicole Stundzia:

“I took her picture and chip number in hopes we could figure a way to get her to the states. I returned and shared “Mama’s” story with my friends at RAGOM," said Nicole. "We decided we had to rescue her, and we found a generous volunteer and her family who offered to make the trip to save her and four other dogs.”

Mama and her friends are now with caring foster families, and we're sure it won't be too long before they find a perfect forever home.

Attitudes are changing

Nicola is planning a return trip to China this year to save even more pooches from the dog meat trade.

It's estimated the Chinese eat between 10-20 million dogs each year. The practice goes back thousands of years. Thankfully, attitudes are changing, especially among the country's young people.