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Owner hears his dog make a strange noise, turns around and realises he needs to act fast

Joshua is a former lifeguard with first aid training
© Daily Mail - Youtube

A quick-thinking dog owner saved his beloved pooch after it started choking on a piece of cheese.

By Ashley Murphy, 15 May 2019

Electrician Joshua Aspey, 22, had just treated his three dogs to a price of delicious cheese each. A few seconds later, Joshua noticed that one of his dogs, a Jack Russell named Sally, was in distress.

A quick-thinking hero

She was struggling to breathe and even started to fit. Thankfully, Joshua is a former lifeguard, and he quickly realised that Sally was choking. He sprang into action, using the tried and tested Heimlich manoeuvre to dislodge the cheese.

CCTV  cameras set up in Joshua's kitchen caught the dramatic rescue. When asked about his heroic display, Joshua said:

"I heard her paws scraping on the tiles, so I turned around and saw her fitting. I just started to smack her on the back and shook her head up and down to try to bring it back up. I shook her head back and forth, and the first piece came out. There were two lots of food in there.”

Joshua continued:

" I put my fingers down her throat to get the second bit. Seeing your dog doing that is horrible. My dogs mean the world to me. I grew up with them; they are all I have known. They are part of the family. I used to work as a lifeguard, so have had the training on what to do if someone is choking.”

It seems like “greedy” Sally didn't have the patience to chew her cheese properly and started choking on the large lumps.

Sally recovered shortly after

She recovered shortly after the incident and will be receiving all future treats in bitesize pieces!

The Heimlich manoeuvre is a first aid technique used to treat upper airway obstructions. It's named after Dr Henry Heimlich, who came up with the procedure in 1974.

The first aider stands behind the patient and exerts pressure on the bottom of the diaphragm. This compresses the lungs and diaphragm, forcing the foreign object up through the blocked airways.