Dog poop DNA comes into force and owners face fines

DNA testing can identify the type of dog that created the mess.
The average dog produces 276 pounds of poop every year. © Pixabay

An apartment complex in Minnesota, USA has such a big problem with dog poop that the manager has resorted to DNA testing in an effort to fine lazy owners.

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It’s a great idea (the UK has been doing it for a couple of years) but it was something Endi apartment manager Peggy Walsh hoped to avoid: DNA testing dog poop. However, with her apartment’s residents looking after 56 dogs, the recreation areas around the building were fast becoming unusable.

Walsh told KPLC News, ‘the average dog produces 276 pounds of poop every year, and with more than one-third of the Endi Apartments’ residents owning the animals, that can leave a lot of poop on the ground.’

Enough is enough… poop

Everyone knows, as a dog owner in this building, it’s their responsibility to pick up their own waste,’ Walsh continued. ‘The safety is a big one for us and the environmental impact because all of the bacteria that grows out of just even one fecal dropping of a dog.’

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Walsh has already implemented tests of four deposits. Samples were sent to PooPrints: a company that analyses the sample and matches the extracted DNA against a profile database of registered dogs.

BioPet Laboratories – the company behind Pooprints – has profiled almost 300,000 dogs across the US, Canada and the UK, according to President J Retinger.

When the results arrive, the apartment residents who own the offending dogs will be fined $350 for a first offence and $450 for a second; a third offence could mean the residents are evicted, according to KPLC News.

Endi’s manager hopes her action against owners who do not clear up after their dog will be a sufficient deterrent, and will lead to a cleaner living space for everyone.

Read also: 2019 pooping dog calendar is here, and it’s the shittiest calendar ever

Nick John Whittle lives and works in Birmingham, UK. He is a specialist copywriter, journalist and theatre critic. Over the years Nick’s family has owned dogs, cats, rodents and birds. The history of animal domestication and of people’s relationship with their pets over the centuries interests him a lot. He cares greatly about the welfare of both feral and domesticated animals and supports ongoing protection of endangered species.